French Camino Stage 3 Burgos to Astorga

French Camino Stage 3 Burgos to Astorga

French Camino Stage 3 Burgos to Astorga walk starts in the once capital city of Castille. On your way to Astorga you will find the lovely and historical villages of Carrion de los Condes, Frómista and Sahagun. In Leon you will have the opportunity to  visit the Cathedral and San Isidoro before you arrive in Astorga, a city known wince the romans founded it for its Cathedral and the Gadi Palace.

On the French Camino Stage 3 Burgos to Astorga expect to cover on average 20 to 25 kilometres per day walking between five and eight hours each day. You do not need high levels of fitness, however the fitter you are the more you will enjoy the experience. If you are a regular walker you should have no difficulty. Get in training be doing regular walks during the week of 30-45 mins and longer walks at the weekend. You should do as much walking as possible prior to your walk as this will simply add to your enjoyment. That said if you are not at peak fitness you will find you will soon walk yourself fit.

We recommend April/May when the spring flowers are at there best and September/October when the what the autumn leaves are turning. It can get very hot in June, July and August.

Highlights

  • Experiencing a sense of timelessness and freedom amongst the rolling green hills.
  • Enjoying an endless succession of beautiful churches and buildings on the route.
  • Experiencing the buzz and bustle of some of Northern Spain’s most beguiling cities.
  • Meeting fellow pilgrims, hearing their stories and travel tips along the way

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT?

Don’t worry. Just because it’s not here, doesn’t mean we can’t do it. Let us tailor make your Camino walk the way you want it. Call us on +353 1 2590133 or email sales@adventure-holidays.ie and tell us what you’re looking for.

Start Point:Burgos
End Point: Astorga
Duration:: 12 nights 13 days
Total distance:: 226km
Accommodation:: 2, 3, 4* hotels bed & breakfast
Meals: 12 Breakfasts
Luggage Transfer: Available at €134 supplement.
Fitness Levels

Expect to cover on average 20 to 25 kilometres per day walking between five and eight hours each day. You do not need high levels of fitness, however the fitter you are the more you will enjoy the experience. If you are a regular walker you should have no difficulty. Get in training be doing regular walks during the week of 30-45 mins and longer walks at the weekend. You should do as much walking as possible prior to your walk as this will simply add to your enjoyment. That said if you are not at peak fitness you will find you will soon walk yourself fit.

What type of trails will I be walking on?
A mixture of farm/dirt tracks, minor roads and footpaths. The route is way-marked on rocks walls and buildings with yellow painted arrows and shells. The are always other walkers to ask for assistance if required.

When do I need to book?
We suggest you book as far in advance as possible as the Camino is very popular with up to 100, 000 people walking the route. Ideally you should not leave it later than 8 weeks before departure.

Why is baggage transfer optional?
Most walkers carry their own bags. If you pack lightly (10kgs) you can comfortably carry what you need. As you will be staying in hotels you will be provided with toiletries, towels etc. If you want to avoid washing you clothes along the way, or bring more clothes use the luggage transfer option.

When is the best time of year to go?
We recommend April/May when the spring flowers are at there best and September/October when the what the autumn leaves are turning. It can get very hot in June, July and August.
What happens if I can’t walk a stage?
Public transport and taxis are available, if you are need of support our local partner in Spain will be more that happy to help.

What we do

We put together the trip for you: reserve the hotels, transfer the luggage and organise your transfers to the start of your itineraries. Each tour includes a complete Road book with detailed itineraries, information for visits along the way, a detailed map and total peace of mind with our 24-hour local support.

We work with local operators through-out each destination that are passionate about their regions.

We can tailor make this tour, if you want to add an extra rest day, spend a few days relaxing before or after the trip just let us know and we will be happy to provide a quotation.

Day 1
Arrive Burgos
Overnight: 4* Hotel Almirante Bonifaz in Burgos


Day 2
Burgos – Hornillos

Passing Through
Burgos,Tardajos, Rabé de las Calzadas, Hornillos del Camino

Burgos, a city in Castilla-Leon situated in the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela, still preserves important vestiges of its medieval splendour. The city, which was the capital of the unified kingdom of Castilla-Leon for five centuries, boasts a masterpiece of Spanish Gothic architecture: the cathedral of Burgos, declared World Heritage. Aside from a visit to the historic quarter, you can take a quite interesting walk along the banks of the Duero and Arlanza rivers. Great places to approach a delicious, varied cuisine.

Rest areas
Tardajos (beside the pilgrims’ hostel): wooded area with benches.

Distance: 19 Km
Overnight: Cottage Hotel Sol a Sol in Hornillos


Day 3

Hornillos – Castrojeriz

Passing Through
Hornillos del Camino, Arroyo de San Bol, Hontanas, Castrojeriz

Rest areas
Castrojeriz: area with drinking fountains, trees and benches. On the way out of the district at the top of Mostelares, there is a rest area with benches and a drinking water fountain.

Distance: 20 Km
Overnight: 3* Hotel La Cachava in Castrojeriz


Day 4
Castrojeriz – Fromista

Passing Through
Castrojeriz, Itero del Castillo, Itero de la Vega, Boadilla del Camino, Frómista

The capital of Palencia’s Romanesque legacy, the town of Frómista is a major communications hub and a staging post on the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela.
Churches such as San Pedro and Santa María form one of the main cultural attractions of the town, along with the hermitage of Santiago and its image of the Virgen del Otero. But Frómista’s most prized gem is the church of San Martín, a work of art conceived as an image. This temple, which was founded in 1035, stands out because of the simplicity of its lines and the perfect balance struck between the architecture and the incredible wealth of decoration. A magnificent display of light, colours and lines which represents a milestone in the Romanesque style linked to the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela. Two kilometres from town is the Pozomingo fountain, where remains have been uncovered of what could have been Frómista in the Roman age, before Arab occupation.

Rest areas
Itero del Castillo: surrounding the shrine of San Nicolás there is a grove of trees with a drinking fountain and rustic tables. Itero de la Vega: at the entrance to the town beside the La Pieda shrine there are drinking fountains, tables, barbecues and trees. Boadilla del Camino: at the entrance to town there is a rest area with a curious waterwheel-type fountain, tables, benches and trees. Frómista: located at the entrance to the town in Pago de la Teja, it has a drinking fountain, tables, benches and a wooded area.

Distance: 25 Km
Overnight: 3* Hotel Doña Mayor in Fromista


Day 5
Fromista – Carrion

Passing Through
Frómista, Población de Campos, Villovieco, Revenga de Campos, Villarmentero de Campos, Villalcazar de Sirga, Carrión de los Condes

The capital of Palencia’s Romanesque legacy, the town of Frómista is a major communications hub and a staging post on the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela.
Churches such as San Pedro and Santa María form one of the main cultural attractions of the town, along with the hermitage of Santiago and its image of the Virgen del Otero. But Frómista’s most prized gem is the church of San Martín, a work of art conceived as an image. This temple, which was founded in 1035, stands out because of the simplicity of its lines and the perfect balance struck between the architecture and the incredible wealth of decoration. A magnificent display of light, colours and lines which represents a milestone in the Romanesque style linked to the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela. Two kilometres from town is the Pozomingo fountain, where remains have been uncovered of what could have been Frómista in the Roman age, before Arab occupation.

Carrión de los Condes is a town of great importance at the time of the old pilgrimages to Santiago de Compostela. Its medieval origins can be seen in some of the historic buildings and in the old town.
The most characteristic building of Carrión de los Condes is the church of Santiago, famous for its splendid Panthocrator. Also significant are the frieze in the church of Santa María del Camino, embellished by an Adoración de los Magos; and the convent of Santa Clara, founded in the 13th century, with an adjoining church and museum which displays sculpture and ornaments, as well as a Piedad by Gregorio Fernández. On the outskirts of the city, near the medieval bridge, is the monastery of San Zoilo, a former pilgrims’ shelter started in the 10th century. Its Renaissance cloister is outstanding, a genuine ornamental and technical wonder which is the work of Juan de Badajoz.

Rest areas
Población de Campos (beside the shrine of San Miguel): there is an area with tables, benches and trees. Villovieco (beside the river): area with benches, tables and trees. Revenga de Campos (on the way out of the town): drinking fountain, tables, benches and wooded area. Villarmentero de Campos (on the way out of the town): area with drinking fountain, tables, benches, barbecues and generous shade from a number of pine trees. Villalcázar de Sirga (on the side of the road from Frómista to Carrión): wooded area with tables and benches. Carrión de los Condes (in the Eden park, beside the river, 50 metres from the Plaza Mayor square): ample poplar grove with a drinking fountain, tables and barbecues. On the Calzada de Piedra path (on the way out of Carrión opposite the Monastery of San Zoilo): shade, with tables and benches.

Distance: 20 Km
Overnight: 3* Hotel San Zoilo in Carrion de los Condes


Day 6
Carrion – Calzadilla

Passing Through
Carrión de los Condes, Cervatos de la Cueza, San Román de la Cuba, Pozo Urama, Villada, Pozuelos del Rey, Grajal de Campos, Calzadilla de la Cueza

Rest areas
San Román de la Cuba (in the main square): attractive green area. Villada: green areas. Calzadilla de la Cueza (on the way out of town, a few metres off the road): area with benches, a drinking fountain and tall poplar trees.

Distance: 17 Km
Overnight: 1* Hotel Camino Real in Calzadilla


Day 7
Calzadilla – Sahagun

Passing Through
Calzadilla de la Cueza, Terradillos de los Templarios, Moratinos, San Nicolás del Real Camino, Sahagún

Sixty-seven kilometres to the south-east of Leon we find Sahagún, a historic city that stretches on top of a smooth mound, whose nerve centre is the main square, or Plaza Mayor, which still has its original porches.
In the streets we can see some houses with brick and wooden structures, and some others that were built with clay and straw. The local artistic heritage, the legacy of a booming past, includes remarkable buildings such as the monastery of San Benito el Real, from which only a Neoclassical arch still stands; the Mudejar churches of San Tirso and San Lorenzo, from the 12th and 13th centuries, respectively; the convent of the Benedictines, presently the site of the Sahagún Museum; and the sanctuary of Peregrina, in the outskirts.

Flora, fauna and crops
Landscapes with cereal crops which in the area near Sahagún are gradually transformed into riverbank vegetation near the Cea and Valderaduey rivers.

Gastronomic products,
Cakes and pastries This is an area where the gastronomic specialities feature numerous game dishes and hearty garlic soups. Near Sahagún the fare consists of an abundance of garden produce, freshwater crayfish, snails, frogs legs, and sausages and cured meats. And for dessert, the almond biscuits and sweets made by the nuns of Sahagún.

Rest areas
Terradillo de los Templarios (near the hostel): small area equipped with tables, benches, a barbecue and a drinking fountain. One kilometre and a half past Terradillo there is another rest area, and another one after 1 kilometre. Moratinos (in the doorway built onto one of the sides of the church): wooden benches for resting, beside a drinking fountain. San Nicolás del Real Camino (beside the church): small landscaped garden with stone benches and a drinking fountain.

Distance: 21 Km
Overnight: 1* Hostal Domus Viatoris in Sahagun


Day 8
Sahagun – Burgo Ranero

Passing Through
Sahagún, Calzada del Coto, Calzadilla de los Hermanillos, Bercianos del Real Camino, El Burgo Ranero

Flora, fauna and crops
This is a land of low treeless hills, cereal crops, sunflowers and grapevines. One of the routes is laid out over the old Roman road and passes through the large holm-oak wood of Valdelocajos. The other route is more frequented by pilgrims and consists of a path lined with numerous planted trees, and equipped with rest areas.

Gastronomic products
Cakes and pastries Game dishes, soups, pulses, milk-fed lamb, sausages and cured meats, trout, stews and casseroles.

Rest areas
Calzada del Coto track (near the shrine of Ntra. Sra. de Perales de Bercianos). Calzadilla de los Hermanillos (6 kilometres from the Calzada del Coto, just after the area at Valdelocajos): with a drinking fountain. Fuente del Peregrino (Calzadilla): with a wooded area and tables. Bercianos del Real Camino (on the way out of town): area with trees and benches. El Burgo Ranero: areas with trees and benches. This is one of the longest stretches of road without any intermediate towns or villages.

Distance: 18 Km
Overnight: 1* Cottage Piedras Blancas in Burgo Ranero


Day 9
Burgo Ranero – Mansilla

Passing Through
El Burgo Ranero, Reliegos, Mansilla de las Mulas

Rest areas
Mansilla de las Mulas (800 metres): area equipped with tables and benches; 500 metres on, area with tables and benches.

Distance: 19 Km
Overnight: 1* Pension La Paz in Mansilla


Day 10
Mansilla – Leon

Passing Through
Mansilla de las Mulas, Mansilla Mayor, Villaverde de Sandoval, Nogales, Villamoros de Mansilla, Puente Villarente, Arcahueja, Valdelafuente, Puente Castro – León

The Pulchra Leonina, the Sistine Chapel; of Spanish Romanesque architecture and the old Hospital de San Marcos are the key points of this former Roman encampment. Over the course of time, León became the capital of the kingdom in the Middle Ages, a historic enclave on the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela and a city perfectly suited to its inhabitants. The incredible natural landscape of this province will take take us to the Picos de Europa National Park, the area of Las Médulas (a World Heritage Site) and the winter resort of San Isidro. A cultural and leisure offer which is only surpassed by the quality and variety of León’s gastronomy.

Flora, fauna and crops
This is the typical agricultural landscape of León, consisting of flat plains, with riverbank vegetation near the watercourses.

Gastronomic products
Cakes and pastries Trout, sausages and cured meats, black pudding, chorizo, lamb, kid, partridge and quail are the typical local products.

Rest areas
Puente Villarenten bridge (beside the Porma river): natural space with an ample wooded area and picnic facilities. Puente Castro (beside the river at the footbridge)

Distance: 18 Km
Overnight: 4* Hotel Conde Luna in León


Day 11
Leon – Villadangos

Passing Through
León, Trobajo del Camino, La Virgen del Camino, Fresno del Camino, La Aldea de la Valdoncina, Robledo de la Valdoncina, Estación de Villadangos, Oncina de la Valdoncina, Chozas de Abajo, Villar de Mazarife, Villavante, Valverde del Camino, S. Miguel del Camino, Villadangos del Páramo

Main difficulties
On this stage there are several alternative routes. The southern route through Fresno del Camino has gentle slopes.

Flora, fauna and crops
It is a flat area which has been much altered by human intervention, and the construction of a series of channels has transformed the river plain into a fertile agricultural land with a wide range of irrigated crops.

Gastronomic products
Cakes and pastries This area is especially productive in fruits, vegetables and cereals, as well as pulses, meat and fish, particularly trout.

Rest areas
La Virgen del Camino (in the Fuentina area): there is a wooded area with tables and a drinking fountain. Villar de Mazarife (in the park): drinking fountain, trees and bench. Villadangos del Páramo (at the artificial lake known as El Estanque).

Distance: 22 Km
Overnight: 2* Hostal Libertad in Villadangos


Day 12
Villadangos – Astorga

Passing Through
Villadangos del Páramo, San Martín del Camino, Hospital de Órbigo, Villares de Órbigo, Santibáñez de Valdeiglesias, S. Justo de la Vega, Astorga

The capital of the county of Maragatería in the province of León offers a rich medieval legacy, the result of its location at the crossroads of: the Pilgrim’s Road to Santiago de Compostela and the Ruta de la Plata (Silver Road). Its walled town preserves churches, convents and hospitals which take travellers back to the purest tradition of the Pilgrim’s Road. Another outstanding feature in the town’s streets is a culminating work by the Modernist architect Antoni Gaudí: the Bishop’s Palace. Astorga is, also, a good opportunity for enjoying the rich cuisine of this area.

Main difficulties
This area marks the start of the change in level, with small elevations and hills.

Flora, fauna and crops
Areas of riverbank with a predominance of poplar groves and the last wheatfields to be seen on the Way. The fauna includes storks, crows, hare, rabbit, foxes and some wolves. From Hospital de Órbigo the first kilometres of the route are across a fertile plain with tobacco and beet crops, and a wide range of vegetables, then come the first differences in level with several hills set among holm oaks.

Gastronomic products,
Cakes and pastries The star dish in this area is trout, and particularly in soup. The local speciality is definitely the cocido maragato (chickpea stew). Little cakes and chocolate are the typical confectionery of Astorga.

Rest areas
Hospital de Órbigo: there is an ample wooded area with tables, benches and barbecues. San Justo de la Vega (past the town on the right bank of the river): broad wooded area with tables, benches and barbecues.

Distance: 27 Km
Overnight: 4* Hotel Ciudad de Astorga in Astorga


Day 13
Journey Home

Dates:
Available January – December

Price

  • €688 per person Sharing double room.
  • €256 single supplement
  • €134 optional baggage transfer

Included

  • Accommodation as per Itinerary
  • 12 breakfasts
  • Luggage transfers available at €134 supplement
  • Detailed route notes and maps
  • 24/7 local support
  • Optional private airport transfers

Your Accommodation

Where you rest your head after an active day is hugely important to us. We go to great lengths to find properties that are unique expressions of the region you are travelling through. Think of them as the charming and intimate garnish atop your trip. 

Whether nestled in the heart of a village or lost in the countryside and surrounded by nature, all accommodations are chosen using a strict criteria of comforthospitality, and authentic charm. We like to use locally run independent small hotels, guest houses and B&Bs instead of the larger “chain” hotels.  All of them are hand-picked, visited, and re-visited by our local partners. On most of our holidays you will be staying in different hotels and their  uniqueness and individual character only adds to the enjoyment of your holiday. You will also benifit with knowledge that your trip is contributing to local economies, and supporting local family run businesses.

You will be welcomed in a double or twin room (2 beds) – based on double occupancy.
All of our rooms have private bathrooms.
Individual rooms are possible upon request when you book; they are subject to availability and incur a supplemental fee.
For biking trips, all of our inns have a safe place to keep bicycles for the night

Flights are not included in the price. Adventure Holidays do not book flights. We will  advise you on best times, dates and airfares to book.

Getting There
From either you can connect by train to Madrid with RENFE which takes around 2 and a half hours (Burgos) or 3 hours (Leon). Alternatively you can take the bus with ALSA which takes around 3 hours (Burgos) or 4 hours (Leon).

From Price pp

€688